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Crohn's DiseaseCrohn's Disease Treatment

Let's Talk About Crohn's Disease Treatment

OK, so you’ve got your diagnosis. Now, let’s figure out the best way to help you feel better, fast.

    Our Pro PanelCrohn’s Disease Treatment

    We went to some of the nation’s top experts on Crohn's to bring you the most up-to-date information possible.

    Jami Kinnucan, M.D.

    Jami Kinnucan, M.D.Gastroenterologist, IBD Specialist, and Assistant Professor of Medicine

    University of Michigan School of Medicine
    Ann Arbor, MI
    Stephen Lupe, Psy.D. headshot.

    Stephen Lupe, Psy.D.Clinical Health Psychologist Specializing in IBD

    Cleveland Clinic’s Inflammatory Bowel Disease Medical Home
    Cleveland, OH
    Neilanjan Nandi

    Neilanjan Nandi, M.D.Director of the Inflammatory Bowel Disease Center

    Drexel University School of Medicine
    Philadelphia

    Frequently Asked QuestionsCrohn’s Disease Treatment

    Can I take Crohn’s meds during pregnancy?

    In many cases, yes. Major exception: Methotrexate, an immunomodulator, can cause abortion and congenital deformations. Both women and men should stop taking methotrexate three to six months before conception. It’s also best not to be on steroids early in pregnancy or certain biologics in late pregnancy. Check with your doc.

    What is short bowel syndrome?

    The small intestine has three sections, each of which does a specific job in the digestion process. When large amounts of the small intestine are removed, it literally shortens your bowel, which makes it tough for the body to absorb adequate amounts of water, vitamins, and other nutrients. The most common symptom is chronic diarrhea.

    How can I stop stressing over needing surgery?

    For starters, get out and socialize to take your mind off your illness. Join a support group nearby or online. The more you get to know other Crohn’s patients, the more coping tips you’ll learn and the more normal you’ll feel. Exercise and mindfulness practices like meditation, deep-breathing, and yoga are also good stress-reducers.

    Can I take over-the-counter meds for symptoms?

    Probably, but talk to your doctor first to make sure they won’t interact with your prescription medications. Generally speaking, anti-diarrheal and anti-gas medications are usually okay, as is acetaminophen for pain. Avoid nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen, naproxen, and aspirin because they may irritate your digestive system.

    Stephanie Wood

    Stephanie Wood

    Stephanie Wood is a award-winning freelance writer and former magazine editor specializing in health, nutrition, wellness, and parenting.